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I'll steal your veggies.

atomicbookworm said: Could you draw a puppy sized elephant drinking coffee with either a llama named French or a French llama? (Or any other interpretation of "French the Llama")

hanklerfishcomic:

okayisanincorrectconcept:

hanklerfishcomic:

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I HAVE WAITED SO LONG FOR SOMETHING THIS EXCELLENT AND BEAUTIFUL THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU BRILLIANT I LOVE YOU

Thank you, I’m glad you appreciate it! 

I'll steal your veggies.

Anonymous said: can u do a drawing to show that i love and appreciate my cat :))))

rubyetc:

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221b-bitch-please-street:

gabite:

cradily:

sophlaa:

cradily:

irish is such a shady language because hello is “dia duit” but directly translated it means “god be with you” and when someone says hello back they say “dia is muire duit” which means “god and mary be with you” .. its like “i see your god and i raise you the holy virgin whatcha gonna do bout it bitch”

irish isnt a language…

Ith mo thóin

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image

(via jocosejoni)

cornilatai:

baby-in-an-over-coat:

frustration-squared:

satyr-hyped:

nethesem:

cosplayandgeekstuff:

Major Sam Cosplay (Australia) as Jessica Rabbit.

Selfie and

Photo II by: Chris from Volk Photography

Photo III by: Lorenzo So Photography

Holy shit you are doing it right…

Oh my stars.

Christ

DAMN

Holy shit

Hot damn!

(via jocosejoni)

*59

I'll steal your veggies.

Anonymous said: please post nudes

andrewismusic:

here are some nude dogs

Lesbians told to ‘move or die’ after their house gets broken into

gaywrites:

A married lesbian couple in Michigan suffered from a horrific series of hate crimes recently, and the description is cringeworthy.

Thieves broke into the lesbian couple’s home in Kalamazoo, Michigan, stole items, destroyed their wedding photos and wrote anti-gay slurs on the walls.

Included in the messages written in graffiti on the walls were “move or die,” and other messages.

This couple was obviously targeted because they’re gay. However, the police can’t pursue this as a hate crime because Michigan law doesn’t protect against hate crimes based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

This terrifies and infuriates me all at once. My heart goes out to these poor women. 

nprglobalhealth:

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone
Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. “Obama’s Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. “Is the fist bump the new high-five?” NPR’s Laura Silverman asked.
Obama has done it again.
Earlier this month he cemented the gesture as part of his presidential persona when he fist bumped an employee at an Austin barbecue restaurant. Before taking Obama’s order, Daniel Rugg said, “Equal rights for gay people,” the Austin Chronicle reported. Then the presidential bump followed.
All this fist-to-fist action got us thinking: Where did the fist bump come from? Why is it so appealing that the president uses it? And do other cultures have similar nonverbal gestures?
The modern fist bump most likely evolved from the high-five in the sports world, says David Givens, an anthropologist with the Center for Nonverbal Studies in Spokane, Washington. The 1970s Baltimore Bullets guard Fred Carter was an early bumper, Time reported back in 2008. Eventually the fist bump became a way for friends to greet each other.
Givens believes that the fist bump stands out in the world of nonverbal gestures. “The fist bump is one of the few gestures that is equal,” he tells Goats and Sodas. “You could do it with President Obama, and you’d both be equals at that time.”
That’s because the knuckles are meeting at the same level — neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.
Continue reading.
Photo by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

nprglobalhealth:

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone

Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. “Obama’s Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. “Is the fist bump the new high-five?” NPR’s Laura Silverman asked.

Obama has done it again.

Earlier this month he cemented the gesture as part of his presidential persona when he fist bumped an employee at an Austin barbecue restaurant. Before taking Obama’s order, Daniel Rugg said, “Equal rights for gay people,” the Austin Chronicle reported. Then the presidential bump followed.

All this fist-to-fist action got us thinking: Where did the fist bump come from? Why is it so appealing that the president uses it? And do other cultures have similar nonverbal gestures?

The modern fist bump most likely evolved from the high-five in the sports world, says David Givens, an anthropologist with the Center for Nonverbal Studies in Spokane, Washington. The 1970s Baltimore Bullets guard Fred Carter was an early bumper, Time reported back in 2008. Eventually the fist bump became a way for friends to greet each other.

Givens believes that the fist bump stands out in the world of nonverbal gestures. “The fist bump is one of the few gestures that is equal,” he tells Goats and Sodas. “You could do it with President Obama, and you’d both be equals at that time.”

That’s because the knuckles are meeting at the same level — neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.

Continue reading.

Photo by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

(via npr)

kickingcones:

Give a dog a coupon, and it uses it one time. Teach a dog to cut coupons and….

image

ps. Meet Milly, the newest member of the wolf pack :)

larstheyeti:

happy Monday.
[theawkwardyeti.com]

larstheyeti:

happy Monday.

[theawkwardyeti.com]

clientsfromhell:

Client: I threw out that black pen, it was out of ink.

Me: What black pen?

Client: The one that was lying on your tablet.

Me: You threw out my $150 Wacom pen?

Client: I tried writing with it and it didn’t work. It must’ve been out of ink.

explore-blog:

Jeanette Winterson on reading, time, and how art creates a sanctified space for the human experience – spectacular 1994 interview. 

explore-blog:

Jeanette Winterson on reading, time, and how art creates a sanctified space for the human experience – spectacular 1994 interview. 


Just a pool, disguised as a pond, with a trampoline instead of a diving board.
I wrote a paper about these kinds of pools several years ago for a class when they were just prototypes. These pools have a natural filtration system that run based on the plants that are in the pool that give the water nutrients that allow it to not only be crystal clear, but you are also able to drink the water because it becomes so clean. And the best part is that once the initial filtration system is installed and calibrated, it maintains itself and eliminates the need for chlorine or constant maintenance like salt water pools. 

Just a pool, disguised as a pond, with a trampoline instead of a diving board.

I wrote a paper about these kinds of pools several years ago for a class when they were just prototypes. These pools have a natural filtration system that run based on the plants that are in the pool that give the water nutrients that allow it to not only be crystal clear, but you are also able to drink the water because it becomes so clean. And the best part is that once the initial filtration system is installed and calibrated, it maintains itself and eliminates the need for chlorine or constant maintenance like salt water pools. 

(Source: wikingvinning, via mydrunkkitchen)

skunkbear:

NASA engineers use origami as inspiration when they fold up solar panels for their trip to space. Shown here: the Miura fold. Once a piece of paper (or solar array) is all folded up, it can be completely unfolded in one smooth motion. You can read more about origami in space here, and learn how to do the Miura fold in this video:

Image: Astronaut Scott Parazynski repairs a damaged ISS solar panel (NASA)

(via npr)